Orlando Police Testing Amazon's Real-Time Facial Recognition

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sUzuJc-xBEE Updated at 4:35 p.m. ET Tech companies are trying to sell police real-time facial recognition systems, which can track and identify people as they walk down the street. As NPR reported two weeks ago , American police have generally held off, but there's new evidence that one police department — Orlando, Fla. — has decided to try it out. What's more, Orlando ordered its facial recognition system from Amazon. This information was uncovered by the ACLU...

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WKNO Features

WKNO-TV

It's the question that usually follows "Does Shelby County need universal pre-k?" 

How to pay for it.

The solution could require a combination of public and private dollars. This week on WKNO-TV's Behind the Headlines, the efforts to expand pre-k are discussed by some of the major proponents. Joining host Eric Barnes is Kathy Buckman Gibson with Seeding Success; Mike Carpenter, executive director for TQEE; and city councilman Kemp Conrad. They are joined by Bill Dries, senior reporter at the Memphis Daily News. 

Innovative gardens are flourishing in Memphis' historic Cooper Young neighborhood. Also growing: the number of people wanting to check them out. 

The 3rd Annual Cooper Young Garden Walk offers greenthumbs and garden geeks a chance to see what's sproutin' on Saturday and Sunday (May 19 & 20). 

A total of 89 gardens—more than double the amount from the first year—are open for perusal. This year's theme is native plants in an urban setting. 

 

Once more jumping from the television screen to the pages, WKNO-TV's Behind the Headlines host Eric Barnes has come out with another novel The City Where We Once Lived. The book depicts an abandoned city where people choose to live. It's divided by the north and south end; as the novel unfolds readers learn the history of the city as well as the complicated, dark past of the characters. A prequel, Above the Ether, is set to be released in March 2019.

 

Melissa Cookston

With the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest this weekend, we have to talk about barbecue!


WKNO-TV

This week on WKNO-FM's Behind the Headlines, Memphis journalists take a look at the results of the recent primaries and what they have in store for the August election. Also on the roundtable discussion: Graceland's plan for expansion and its ongoing legal disputes with the city and the Grizzlies. Finally, an update on the city council. Host Eric Barnes is joined by Ryan Poe of the Commercial Appeal, Toby Sells of the Memphis Flyer, Karanja Ajanaku of the New Tri-State Defender and Bill Dries of the Memphis Daily News

The arts are as essential as English and math, or so the statistics say. Here's one: students in the arts are four times more likely to earn academic honors.

That's why this Saturday (May 12), Shelby County Schools is highlighting over 900 student performers and nearly a thousand pieces of student artwork from more than 150 different Schools.  

Joel Hurd WKNO-FM

Last week's overflow crowd at the Stax Museum of American Soul Music had good reason to be excited. On the 15th Anniversary of the museum's opening, Executive Director Jeff Kollath entered stage left wearing white gloves and carrying a baritone saxophone. He then placed it on a stand in the center of the stage. A key instrument of the Stax sound was home.


Andrea LeTard

Some moms are great cooks and others are great at ordering take-out.


WKNO-TV

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland visits WKNO-TV's Behind the Headlines this week to look ahead at some of the issues facing the city in the future. Deannexation could have an impact on the city's tax base and income, but could also help cut the city's expenses. Also, the mayor talks about the tax incentives called PILOTs (Payment In Lieu of Taxes), seen as a way to attract new business to Memphis. Host Eric Barnes is joined by Bill Dries of the Memphis Daily News.

Orpheum Theatre Group

 

As the Orpheum Theatre's regular season comes to a close, education programs take center stage. The Orpheum Theatre's Vice President of Education, Jennifer McGrath, stops by WKNO-FM for an interview with Darel Snodgrass. McGrath talks about some of the upcoming summer educational programs for children. In addition, she mentions a professional development program for teachers, in all fields of study, not just the arts, which helps them integrate some form of artistry into their classrooms.  


Pages

Legislation that would allow terminally ill patients to get access to experimental drugs is headed to the president's desk.

The House on Tuesday passed a "right-to-try" bill that was approved by the Senate in 2017.

"People who are terminally ill should not have to go from country to country to find a cure," said Rep. Michael Burgess, R-Texas, on the House floor Tuesday.

The bill, which President Trump is expected to sign, has patient advocates divided.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

For decades, Americans have seen celebrities through photographer Mark Seliger's lens. His work has appeared in magazines such as Vanity Fair, GQ and Rolling Stone.

"Having a sense of humor" is important to the work, he says. "Whether it's a big concept or whether it's a wink."

Almost a year before the shooting at Columbine High School, a teenage boy wearing a trench coat walked into the Thurston High School cafeteria in Springfield, Ore. and began shooting at his fellow students.

The shooter that day, May 21, 1998, was 15-year-old Kipland Kinkel. He was armed with more than 1,000 rounds of ammunition, along with two pistols when he started firing his father's Ruger .22 caliber rifle.

Kinkel killed two students at Thurston and wounded 25 others. Later, police found Kinkel's parents' dead at home. He had shot them as well.

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TENNESSEE NEWS

Citing Need To Move On, Haslam To Allow 'Sanctuary Cities' Bill To Become Law Without His Signature

Updated at 2:06 p.m. A measure that would require government agencies and local police in Tennessee to work with federal immigration authorities will become law, despite a vigorous campaign urging Gov. Bill Haslam to veto the measure.

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ARKANSAS NEWS

National Park Service Honors Member Of The Little Rock Nine With Commemorative Bench

The National Park Service is celebrating the groundbreaking of a replica city bench where Little Rock Nine member, Elizabeth Eckford, sought refuge during the 1957 desegregationcrisis. On September 4th, 1957 Eckford sat on a bench at the corner of Park and 16th street, after walking through a mob of protestors to enter Central High School. She was the only member of the Little Rock Nine to show up that day because hers was the only family that didn't have a telephone. Recalling the incident...

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